The Spirit Of Religious Tolerance Found in Ancient Indian Ruins
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The Spirit Of Religious Tolerance Found in Ancient Indian Ruins

Ellora Caves, Maharashtra, India
Summary:

The Ellora Caves of Maharashtra, India are worthy of Sunday spiritual contemplation. Adorned with the patina of age and beautiful shades of gray, religious tolerance was delicately carved from Earth’s foundational rock.

The Ellora Caves of Maharashtra, India are worthy of Sunday spiritual contemplation. Adorned with the patina of age and beautiful shades of gray, religious tolerance was delicately carved from Earth’s foundational rock.


There are 34 rock-cut Buddhist, Hindu and Jain temples and monasteries from 7th to 10th centuries at Ellora. The most amazing is Cave 16: the Kailasa Temple (Kailasha, Kailash, Kailasanatha). It is the largest monument in the world cut from monolithic rock, UNESCO World Heritage Site.

According to UNESCO: “These 34 monasteries and temples, extending over more than 2 km, were dug side by side in the wall of a high basalt cliff… Not only is the Ellora complex a unique artistic creation and a technological exploit but, with its sanctuaries devoted to Buddhism, Hinduism and Jainism, it illustrates the spirit of tolerance that was characteristic of ancient India.”

~ Amazing Places on Our Planet

For more arresting armchair travel, visit the Amazing Places on Our Planet Youtube channel.


Religious Tolerance of the Ancients

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Graffiti Girl
6 comments
  • Our country could use a similar place to unite us all at this divisively hostile moment of Trump’s bumbling leadership. In my roadtrip , sadly I have seen little physical evidence that Americans embrace their land.My Mississippi River blog attempts to make the point that everyone depends on nature’s gift like this majestic river.

  • I am totally amazed by the skill and talent showcased in these rock carvings! I agree with Hugh about the inherent intolerance of Christianity, and I agree with JoAnn that the adoption of Christianity by the Romans corrupted the church.

  • Interesting that the Christian religion which centered around the love of God and our fellow men became the least tolerant religion ever preached and led to atrocities such as the Spanish Inquisition and innumerable religious persecutions — all in the name of love! Humans are a strange species.

    • Very interesting, indeed, Hugh. I think when Constantine endorsed Christianity (313AD) it became politically super-charged. Then you had the First Council of Nicaea (325AD). Too organized? Too political? Too large? Surely a faithful remnant did not engage in such atrocities.

JoAnn Chateau

Who’s Writing?

JoAnn Chateau

JoAnn likes progressive politics and loves the canines. She writes fiction about Chester, the Alpha Bichon -- with a dash of humor and a dab of Poli-Sci. Her views and insights are tinted by a former profession in Counseling, Christian theological studies, and training in Library and Information Science. Retired now, JoAnn enjoys the creative life.

Chester

Chester is a scruffy little Bichon dog, with a congenial Napoleon Complex, and stars in "The Chester Chronicles." He sometimes reports independent Canine News -- NO corporate treats accepted, NO corporate bias. Woof!

Graffiti Girl

Graffiti Girl (GG) is curator at JoAnnChateau.com. She's progressive to the core, and easily blown away by serendipity and/or good food. (OK, GG is really JoAnn.) GG's posts signal that news or content from another website is a "must-see" and "must-remember."