Advertisements

Coming: The Racial Justice Museum and National Lynching Memorial

Share with Friends:

We expect the Equal Justice Initiative (EJI) to open the new Racial Justice Museum and a haunting National Lynching Memorial in Montgomery, Alabama this year.

In order to heal and free our country from the racism that sickens our social psyche, we must first acknowledge the depth of persecution and the relentless discrimination that has been directed at Black Americans from the time of slavery to modern day mass incarceration.

Then we need to feel remorse. Finally, we need to shoulder the collective social responsibility to never again allow such cruel barbarity to occur anywhere in our nation.


From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration

“There is a line from slavery to the racial bias and discrimination that we see today that needs to be understood. EJI believes that this museum, as well as our upcoming national memorial honoring more than 4000 lynching victims, will help us challenge our country’s narrative about race and poverty.” ~ Equal Justice Initiative


Tour a simulation of the upcoming National Lynching Memorial. The evocative design is unforgettable.

“Commemoration of America’s history of racial terrorism can play a significant role in community-wide reconciliation.” ~ Equal Justice Initiative


February Is Black History Month

10 thoughts on “Coming: The Racial Justice Museum and National Lynching Memorial

  1. I hope that the National Memorial for Peace and Justice will give special recognition to martyred Harry T. Moore for his incredibly brave solo investigations of lynchings in Jim Crow Florida. (His wife was murdered, too.) [http://www.pbs.org/harrymoore/terror/howard.html]

    1. Thanks for the link, Susan. Extremely interesting, although sickening. I’m come to learn, since moving to Florida, that it once was a KKK haven. There remains more of that backward racism than tourists would ever believe. I know you are also a Floridian. What’s your take?

  2. This is a powerful and courageous initiative. There can be no healing where there is ignorance and denial. I find white Americans very reluctant to talk openly with me about racism. Growing up brown-skinned in a former British colony, I was shaped by racism. The identity of white Americans have also been shaped by slavery and the perpetuation of racism. Yet, they appear blind to this reality.

Comments are closed.

Scroll to top